NHS Blackburn with Darwen CCG

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Completed Engagement

When this happened

June and July 2017

July and August 2018

Remains live

Who we engaged with

2017 User Survey : 24

2018 (July and August) – 183 over 50 year old service users

37 GP referrers

Why we engaged

To understand the experiences and views of NHS hearing aid service users to help us improve the service through an improved service specification and procurement.

How we engaged

Mixed methodology: Patient representatives on the procurement panel

Patient focus group

Online survey

Face to face meeting at Pensioners Parliament in Blackpool

Provider Open Day with patient reps involved

Action on Hearing Loss advisory role

GP referrer survey

Results / Findings

Reports are here:

Audiology Patient Survey

Audiology Engagement Event

How patient and public involvement has made a difference

As a result of this work the following has occurred:

  • Commissioners undertook a detailed analysis of the service specification against the key issues raised by patients from the survey, focus groups and discussions. This is here: Audiology Analysis
  • The service specification for NHS Hearing Aids has been revised to reflect patient views and experiences as above.

Two patients have told their story to East Lancashire CCG Governing Body and this has led to their being involved in improving the patient handbook in the audiology service at East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust.


 

When this happened

This engagement activity was undertaken between September and November 2016.

Who we engaged with

We engaged with 311 residents who receive gluten free prescriptions, East Lancashire Coeliac Society, British Coeliac Society, dieticians, GPs and other health professionals.

Why we engaged

We wished to decommission the prescribing of gluten free products as there was no evidence of the benefits and nationally there was a move to decommission gluten free prescribing (latterly NHS England has adopted this policy).

How we engaged

We engaged in a number of ways:

  • Online survey with options for paper based questionnaires
  • Media and social media promotion of the survey to residents
  • GP communication and promotion to their patients

In addition, we engaged with local MPs, councillors and Voluntary, Community and Faith Sector. We also met with the  East Lancashire Coeliac Society to co-produce solutions to the proposal if it was agreed.

Results / findings

The results of the engagement activity is below.

Pennine Lancashire Gluten Free Prescribing Survey Results

They were shared with members of the CCG’s Commissioning Business Group as well as patients, the East Lancashire Coeliac Society and via the media and social media as we the decision was announced.

How patient and public involvement has made a difference

The CCG agreed to decommission gluten-free prescribing, but recognised the value and importance of providing patients with advice and information regarding alternatives and alternative arrangements. The CCG medicines management team worked with the communication and engagement team to produce information and guidance for patients. This was distributed to GPs and pharmacists in the area:

Gluten Free Food Guidelines

Gluten Free Checklist

Gluten Free Diet on a Budget


When this happened

This engagement activity was undertaken by Healthwatch Blackburn with Darwen. The engagement took place between September 2016 and April 2017

Who we engaged with

Healthwatch engaged with 295 individuals over the course of the 8‑month project; 141 questions were completed by those experiencing homelessness in Blackburn with Darwen. The ages ranged from 16 years old to those aged 64 and over.

Why we engaged

To better understand the health  and wellbeing of the homeless population in Blackburn with Darwen, their experience of local health and social care services and their views on local provision.

How we engaged

A variety of methods was used including a more formal questionnaire completed by those experiencing homelessness as well as more informal ways in order to have discussions in a non-intrusive way.

Results / findings

The engagement report generated by Healthwatch Blackburn with Darwen is below. This report was shared with us to consider the findings and recommendations.

Health BwD Homeless Population July 2017

How patient and public involvement has made a difference

We considered and fedback on a number of recommendations from Healthwatch’s report. You can view these recommendations and feedback from us below.

CCG feedback on recommendations



When this happened

January — March 2017.

Who we engaged with

1,439 residents responded to the survey, equating to around 1% of the local population. Information was sent to PPGs, GP practice staff, Citizen Panel members and local MPs with details of the engagement. The survey was also promoted internally to staff who were encouraged to share it with family and friends.

Over the course of the engagement period, our Facebook page reached a total of 162,000 people.

Why we engaged

We considered that the GP prescribing of readily available over the counter medication was an avoidable and sometimes excessive cost and in reality was not effective for patients as they would make a GP appointment for a prescription when they could have visited a retail chemist and bought the over the counter medicine as well as received advice from the chemist.

How we engaged

The engagement was conducted primarily through an online survey supported by media and social media promotion on our Facebook and Twitter page. Paper copies of the questionnaire were distributed to each member GP practice as well as other stakeholders including voluntary, community and faith groups.

We also undertook a range of face-to-face stakeholder engagement activities including presentations to PPGs, Older People’s Forum (Blackburn with Darwen), Healthwatch Blackburn with Darwen and Carers Forum (Blackburn with Darwen). Focus groups were held with Blackburn with Darwen Youth MPs and Blackburn with Darwen Age Well Partnership.

Results / Findings

Patients supported the discontinuation of the prescribing of readily available over the counter medication (on average 77% of the respondents were in support of this).

The reports of the engagement are here:

Prescribing for Clinical Need Policy — Evaluation Report

Appendix 1 — Consultation document and survey

Appendix 2 — Qualitative data

Appendix 3 — Media coverage

Appendix 4 — About You equality monitoring

Appendix 5 — Digital report

The evaluation report was considered by the CCG’s Commissioning Business Group Meeting in April 2017

How patient and public involvement has made a difference

Following a review of the findings, the CCG supported the discontinuation of prescribing for over the counter medication.

While patients supported the proposal, they requested support for self care. The communication and engagement team worked with Medicines Management at the CCG to produce a suite of support documents which were distributed to GP practices and pharmacists for patients. The documents were made available to PPGs and on our website.

A poster informing of the changes was sent to each GP practice within Blackburn with Darwen for display within their surgery areas.

Self-care OTC prescribing poster


When this happened

February and March 2018

Who we engaged with

Midlands and Lancashire Commissioning Support Unit were commissioned by NHS England to to gain insight on the opinions and feedback from parents and carers of children aged under 5 on childhood
immunisation programmes in the East Lancashire and Blackburn with Darwen areas.

Why we engaged

The insight was undertaken to understand current views of parents and carers of children aged under 5 on childhood immunisation programmes in the East Lancashire and Blackburn with Darwen areas around:

  • the uptake for childhood vaccinations for under 5s
  • motivating factors for having/not having the vaccinations
  • information provided and communication channels
  • accessibility of the services
  • any potential barriers

How we engaged

An online survey was developed and promoted to capture the views of those parents/carers. The survey was live between Monday 12 February 2018 and Wednesday 14 March 2018. In addition, two face-to-face focus groups were run on 19 March and 21 March 2018.

Results / findings

Overall, 79 individuals completed the survey and 12 people attended the focus groups.

The insight report can be read here Report of Findings — Immunisation Programmes for Under 5s

How patient and public involvement has made a difference

Following the insight work, which highlighted that some adults cannot read/read English, we have addressed the reading age of the 2 and 3 year old letter and applied easy read images to the back. We are hoping to obtain easy read images as part of the preschool booster promotional materials.

We have seen an increase in uptake in 2 and 3 year olds which could be indicative of success with this initiative.


When this happened

We continued to engage with the public on our plans for Pennine Lancashire from December 2017 to February 2018 and consideration of the findings throughout 2018 up to publication of the Pennine Plan in September 2018.

Who we engaged with

We met with 22 patient groups, and gave out 732 copies of the draft plan. We promoted the engagement widely on social media and online and our website was visited by 13,751 visitors in the period. We received Facebook story reached 44,709 people and Twitter 36,127 people. We received the views of 377 people.

Why we engaged

To understand people’s views about our future plans, and consider any changes to the plans.

How we engaged

Mixed engagement methodology: Online survey,

Face to face survey, focus groups

Results / findings

Our report of the engagement is below. We used the insight, views and experiences expressed in this engagement to consider whether we had missed anything or needed to change anything in our draft plan.

TAHF Draft Pennine Plan

How patient and public involvement has made a difference

We carried out cross checks between what people said, and what we proposed in the plan. We had a scoring system to gauge whether the proposals were understandable, supported or agreed with, and deemed to be beneficial or not. We used this data to strengthen the plan and any further action required.

Workstream leads for the various aspects of the plan received copies of our checks and agreed, or not, with these and changes to the plan were made. We changed some of the language in our plan based on the feedback and we considered the needs of carers and those with dementia further. We carried out these checks from January to August 2018.


When this happened

Engagement took place December 2017 and January 2018 and consideration of the findings throughout 2018 up to publication of the Pennine Plan in September 2018.

Who we engaged with

113 Gypsy, Romany and Travellers (GRT) across East Lancashire and Blackburn with Darwen

Why we engaged

To understand their views about our future plans, and consider any changes to the plans.

The East Lancashire Primary Care Trust undertook a survey in 2006 and we were keen to update this and ensure that commissioners understand the needs of the GRT community.

How we engaged

Focused outreach and peer to peer engagement : we trained GRT researchers to interview other members of the GRT community.

Results / findings

Our report of the engagement is below. We used the insight from this engagement to check against the proposed plan, in particular our plans for integrated neighbourhood working.

Draft Pennine Plan — GRT community

How patient and public involvement has made a difference

This engagement led to greater awareness of the health and care needs of the GRT community amongst commissioners and providers, and we have used the findings to reassure ourselves that our plans will meet the needs of the GRT community. We carried out cross checks against the plan from January – September 2018.


When this happened

May – June 2018.

Who we engaged with

Over 250 young people, family members and other carers – along with health care professionals.

Why we engaged

We are seeking to improve child and adolescent mental health services. The model we wish to introduce is called Thrive, however we recognise that coproduction of the service model with service users will be the best way of developing the best model.

How we engaged

We worked with the Healthwatch Lancashire and South Cumbria collaboration along with CCGs and service providers to support coproduction with children and young people, as well as parents and other stakeholders. This led to the seven co-production workshops at a variety of locations where we listened to the views of children and young people. This has helped us develop the model.

Our communication and engagement strategy is here: strategy and plan — comms & engagement

Results / Findings

The workshops resulted in a report which here:

Appendix 5 Thrive Report FV (2.82 MB)

Appendix 6 THRIVE Final Version (1.68 MB)

We fed the result of the workshops to a further event in September 2018 -

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/phase-2-continuing-to-co-produce-a-draft-clinical-model-of-services-for-children-young-people-and-tickets-49175531338

This was used as a sense check and we used the feedback to further strengthen our plans. We received media coverage about this and the main story is here: https://www.healthyyoungmindslsc.co.uk/news-events/latest-cyp-new/nhs-collaborate-children-and-young-people-improve-their-mental-health-services

How patient and public involvement has made a difference

Much of the information about how we are progressing in the redesign of the service is posted on the programme website here:

https://www.healthyyoungmindslsc.co.uk/camhs-redesign

We undertook a review of what people said, and what we need to do or have done to address these views. This is captured in this document:

Appendix 4, you said, we did FINAL (442 KB)


When this happened

July-August 2017 with action in response throughout 2018/19.

Who we engaged with

837 children and young people (C&YP) including Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning and BME (black and minority ethnic).

Why we engaged

We commissioned Healthwatch Blackburn with Darwen and Healthwatch Lancashire to engage with children and young people across Pennine Lancashire to gather their views and experiences on the issues that affect their health and wellbeing

How we engaged

Mixed methodology:

  • Online survey
  • Face to face survey
  • Peer to peer engagement

Results / findings

The report highlights the need for more support for C&YP particularly around Mental health awareness and keeping healthy.

The views and experiences of CYP in Pennine Lancs

How patient and public involvement has made a difference

At the end of 2017 C&YP presented the findings to Healthwatch Blackburn with Darwen. As part of the joint work in Pennine Lancashire, schools in Blackburn with Darwen have been involved in the filming done by Learn Live, a Lancashire based broadcasting company which broadcast health programmes to all the schools and colleges in the area.

Throughout 2018 and into 2019 we have continued with these broadcasts and these have including mental health awareness, stress management, dealing with cyber bullying, managing asthma and keeping fit. The programmes have proved popular, evaluated well, and we will continue to do these.


When this happened

October – November 2018.

Who we engaged with

193 people who attended urgent care centres in Pennine Lancashire (Blackburn and Burnley Urgent Care Centres and Rossendale and Hyndburn Minor Injuries Units).

Why we engaged

To build our knowledge about urgent care use, and help us understand what is important to people when they choose to attend urgent care.

How we engaged

We adopted a method called “Appreciative enquiry” to gain a deeper understanding of people’s views. We visited urgent care centres and with permission listened to the views of people who were waiting to be seen. We created a series of infographics which we asked people to comment on as well as listening to their views.

Results / Findings

We learned that what matters to attendees at urgent care is convenience, location (close proximity to home), short waiting times, and getting information and advice quickly. You can read the presentation from this work here: Engagement with Service Users

How patient and public involvement has made a difference

We have used this information to inform our developing vision and plans for urgent care in Pennine Lancashire. This builds on a desk top analysis of patient engagement which is referenced in the report, and it will help us formulate further engagement on future options for urgent care services.