NHS Blackburn with Darwen CCG

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Current Engagement

When this engagement started

From September 2018 onwards

Who we’ve engaged with so far

Nelson – 72 people

Accrington – 57 people

Darwen – 94 people

Burnley – 61 people

Blackburn – 101 people

Why we are engaging on this

A partnership from Blackburn with Darwen Council Public Health, Together a Healthier Future, and the CCGs (Blackburn with Darwen and East Lancashire) engaged with people to show them a film about Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and then lead a discussion on how we can better support and manage ACEs in the community and services.

How we have engaged so far

We invited people to attend film showings on Adverse Childhood Experiences via Eventbrite invitations online, which were promoted on social media and in traditional media, as well as through community networks.

The film was followed by a question and answer session with an expert panel, which focused on how, as a community, we can work together to address the issues of childhood trauma.

Findings so far

Communities and services are becoming more aware of ACEs through the events, and this has led to more training. This work is ongoing.

How patient and public involvement is making a difference

Over the series of films we have begun to see greater awareness of ACEs and the beginning of a social movement to promote and support ACE awareness. Services have received training in ACE awareness including our local East Lancashire Child and Adolescent Services (ELCAS).


When this engagement started

Ongoing engagement.

Who we are engaging with

Cancer service users via the Cancer Alliance Patient Experience and Engagement Oversight Group.

Why we are engaging on this

To understand patient experiences of cancer services.

How we are engaging

A work plan is in place, and this will focus on understanding people’s experiences of cancer services using a range of mixed methods, including surveys, interviews and where appropriate patient stories and focus groups.

Findings so far

The Oversight Group has identified the five top areas that are important to them. This has shaped the agenda for further work to elicit the views of people who use cancer services.


When this engagement started

Ongoing engagement.

Who we are engaging with

PPG members and patient representatives.

Why we are engaging on this

We are developing a cancer awareness campaign called “Let’s Talk Cancer” and we involved patients and patient reps to test the materials and help us shape the campaign.

How we are engaging

We have engaged with patients and patient representatives within the pennine cancer alliance, and also within the Patient Participation Groups (PPGs) in Pennine Lancashire.  Patients have contributed to the design and development of the “Let’s Talk about Cancer” campaign and materials – this is currently being further developed based on this feedback.

Findings so far

A report will be published in due course, alongside the campaign which is due to launch from March 2019 onwards.


When this engagement started

January 2019

Who we are engaging with

Older residents aged 65 and over.

Why we are engaging on this

To elicit service user feedback on the concepts of the campaign including images and wording.  The campaign has been developed across Pennine Lancashire  to signpost patients to the relevant service in their area if they have (a) fallen (b) are at risk of falling or © afraid of falling.

How we have engaged so far

We took the design concepts of the campaign to three groups: Hyndburn Over 50s Forum, Blackburn with Darwen Older People’s Group and East Lancashire Patient Partners Board to test the messages.

Findings so far

Participants at the groups told us that the messages were confusing, they didn’t like some of the words used and they didn’t like the images particularly.

How patient and public involvement is making a difference

Based on the feedback we received, the posters were amended to reflect their comments. The campaign is due to launch Spring 2019.


When this engagement started

September 2019

Who we are engaging with

Service users who use or have used the Heart Failure Nursing Service or any other stakeholder with any experience of the service

Why we are engaging on this

To obtain service user feedback to help develop and improve the service so that it meets the needs of patients

How we have engaged so far

Patients and stakeholders have been asked to give their views via a questionnaire or by email, phone or in writing

Findings so far

Feedback has been extremely positive and supportive of the service. There are however some aspects of the service which have been highlighted as suggestions for improvement such as shorter waiting times and more nurses

How patient and public involvement is making a difference

The findings will inform commissioners of any service plans going forward.


When this engagement started

September 2019

Who we are engaging with

Service users and stakeholders

Why we are engaging on this

To obtain service user feedback on what they like about the service and any suggestions they had for improvements.

How we have engaged so far

Patients were asked to give their views via a questionnaire.

Findings so far

58 patients have responded to the questionnaire. They have told us they like the service because it is patient focused and personalised to the patient in their own surroundings, it is a very prompt and enables a fast discharge from hospital. However they don’t like the disjointedness between East Lancashire and Blackburn with Darwen.

How patient and public involvement is making a difference

The findings will inform commissioners of any service plans going forward.



When this engagement started

From October 2018 — throughout 2019. Ongoing.

Who we are engaging with

Maternity ward patients.

Why we are engaging on this

To elicit service user feedback on their experience of maternity care, and to compare the provision with their expectations for good quality care, which is respectful, evidence-based, kind and safe, delivered in welcoming and clean environments.

How we have engaged so far

The members of the Maternity Voices Partnership adopted the 15 Steps methodology to investigate service user views of maternity services. 15 Steps for Maternity is a structured toolkit developed to elicit service user feedback on their experience of maternity care, and to compare the provision with their expectations for good quality care, which is respectful, evidence-based, kind and safe, delivered in welcoming and clean environments. The toolkit was used by the Chair and on one occasion also by the Co-Chair of the Maternity Voices Partnership (MVP), to gain understanding and knowledge for future reviews that will include additional Service Users, and to expedite the process to support an ongoing Maternity Review.

Findings so far

An initial report is being presented to the Maternity Voices Partnership in February 2019 and we will post the findings here as soon as we can.

How patient and public involvement is making a difference

The senior midwifery staff accompanying the visits were very receptive to the questions and observations raised both during the time in the settings and in response to the written reports that followed. The overwhelming impression was positive and it was clear that staff were already aware of some areas which could be improved, however the ‘fresh eyes’ of the reviewers did identify some opportunities to further enhance the patient experience and improve access to excellent care. These were taken on board by the senior team, prioritised and an action plan developed, some items on which were delivered very quickly, demonstrating their commitment to the process.

The intention is for a rolling programme of visits to be undertaken by new Service Users, particularly those from a hard to reach background, to broaden the perspectives gained and as a means to further engage with local families.


When this engagement started

From September 2019 onwards

Who we’ve engaged with so far

18 patients filled in the survey

Why we are engaging on this

The Pennine Lancashire Community DVT Service delivered by Blakewater Healthcare provides a holistic one stop shop approach for patients with suspected DVT for patients living in East Lancashire and Blackburn with Darwen.  The joint CCGs are currently reviewing this service and seeking the views of patients.  We are engaging with patients of the service to understand their experience of the service, to feed into how we design the service in the future.

How we have engaged so far

A social media campaign was launched to recruit patients, past and present, who have experienced DVT so they could join the project group as patient representatives looking at the redesign. Five patients representatives were recruited and three are now part of the monthly project group looking at the specification for the new service. They have already helped to design a patient and GP survey as part of the engagement. They have submitted a patient story case study which the commissioner has used as part of the new specification

Findings so far

The service is regarded as excellent by at patients but some issues around communication and transport have come been raised during the engagement. The patient representatives are now working with the communication team on improving the information in the patient letters.

How patient and public involvement is making a difference

One of the main reasons why patients are not attending during the first four hours following a DVT diagnosis relates to difficulties with transport. In future, the new patient letters will include information and telephone numbers for patient transport for those who need help attending their appointments.


Long Term Plan 

When this engagement started

From September – December 2019

Who we’ve engaged with so far

The Lancashire and South Integrated Care System (ICS) wanted to ensure that the needs of those with complex health conditions were being addressed by recent developments within the healthcare system. The five health and care partnerships were asked to identify priority groups. This information was then passed to the local Healthwatch who delivered focus groups that specifically targeted these groups. In Pennine Lancashire, the priority groups were Mental Health in Darwen; Frailty in East Blackburn; General Health & Wellbeing in West Burnley; General Health & Wellbeing in East Burnley; General Health & Wellbeing in Ribblesdale and Dementia in Hyndburn (rural)

Why we are engaging on this

This project was commissioned by the CCG in partnership with the Lancashire & South Cumbria Integrated Care System (ICS) to deliver focus groups which target priority groups in the area and collate feedback from them about their experiences, ease of access, levels of support and guidance, and any barriers within the system, what matters to them as service users, their engagement and their perceived next steps. Healthwatch were involved in order to ensure that local people remained at the heart of the decisions being made as part of the transformation of our healthcare system. The Focus Group work is part of a wider programme that seeks to establish how the people of Lancashire and South Cumbria feel about the NHS LTP. Healthwatch England designed a survey which would feed responses in to the NHS LTP. The questions focused on identifying what people felt were the important aspects of health care that helped them to prevent ill health and encouraged them to age well.

How we have engaged so far

Focus groups were held in each of the areas and local residents were recruited. A total of 43 people were engaged.

Findings so far

The final engagement report can be accessed here Lancashire & South Cumbria — Final Report (pdf | 1.9 MiB)

How patient and public involvement is making a difference

The Primary Care Networks are using these findings to inform their engagement plans moving forward. They are also using this information to identify priorities and areas for improvement.


Ophthalmology Outpatient Redesign 

When this engagement started

November 2019 and onwards

Who we’ve engaged with so far

Patients who currently use the Opthalmology (Eye Service) including those at the hospital and the four satellite clinics.

Why we are engaging on this

The Ophthalmology (Eye Care) service is due to move from its current location within Burnley Hospital into a new purpose-built building elsewhere on the hospital site. The new service will bring together outpatient clinics, day case, theatres, preoperative service, and the urgent eye service. Additional space has also been secured at St Peter’s Health Centre in Burnley town centre for a “one stop shop” service for patients who will be able to access a range of diagnostic, investigation and clinical services. As a result of the new service, it is proposed to close the four weekly satellite eye clinics – one in Hyndburn, one in Ribblesdale and two in Rossendale. These clinics will be re-located to either Burnley General Hospital or St Peters, Burnley.

How we have engaged so far

Patients were asked to give their views via a questionnaire

Findings so far

The results are currently under review.

How patient and public involvement is making a difference

Their views will be taken into account before any final decisions are made.